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Posts Tagged ‘developing countries’

Smart Low-Tech Designs: Improving harvest yield and storage

Posted in Models, Research by Kate Archdeacon on January 11th, 2012

This week Nourishing the Planet TV showcases some of the work that Compatible Technology International is doing to help farmers preserve or process their crops to reduce loss:

“In its effort to alleviate poverty and hunger in the developing world, Compatible Technology International (CTI) designs, builds, and distributes affordable post-harvest tools—such as a cool storage shed and food processing grinder—for rural farmers in the developing world. CTI’s devices can help farmers process, store, and sell their crops.

While many organizations are focused on improved seeds, access to fertilizers, and irrigation to improve crop yields, relatively few are focused on post-harvest improvements. But many poor farmers live on yields from a hectare or less of land and getting the maximum benefit from those yields can make up the difference between abject poverty and a livable income.

CTI’s technologies are scaled to fit the needs of small villages, families, coops, and micro-businesses. Extra attention is paid to developing safe, affordable, environmentally friendly, energy-efficient, and culturally compatible devices in the hope that they will be more widely adopted and facilitate lasting change in poor farming communities. CTI encourages craftsmen and entrepreneurs in and around these communities to build and sell their devices, reducing dependence on outside assistance once the technology has been adopted.” Matt Styslinger

The episode is essentially taken from an article published by Matt Styslinger for NtP in June last year, so you can choose between reading the full article or watching the synopsis.


Low-Tech Transferable Designs: Pictorial Manuals

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on November 23rd, 2011

Source: No Tech Magazine

From “When Low-Tech Goes IKEA” edited by Deva Lee:

What happens when two industrial design students from Sweden end up in Kenya creating a pedal powered machine for small-scale farmers who are often illiterate and speak more than 60 languages? You get a do-it-yourself design that seems to have come out of the IKEA factories – pictorial manuals included. “Made in Kenya“, the bachelor project of Niklas Kull and Gabriella Rubin, is a textbook example of low-tech made accessible to everybody, regardless of their native tongue and language skills. […]

The students had two aims for their project: to improve the economic conditions of the local small-scale farmers, who make up three quarters of the workforce in the country, and to stimulate the local manufacturing industry. At present, Kenya lacks an industrial-scale manufacturing industry and is highly dependent on the import of goods. The juice extractor is of a capacity and cost that would allow a small group of neighbouring farmers to invest collectively in a small production facility. To keep production costs low, ensure availability in rural areas and promote the domestic manufacturing capacity, the pedal-powered machine does not require complex components or manufacturing methods.  The design manual is aimed at the Jua Kali – the informal manufacturing sector which represents an estimated six million of the Kenyan workforce. With limited capital, modest workshop facilities and narrow access to raw materials, these self-employed blacksmiths and carpenters make handmade products – such as agricultural implements, hand tools and kitchen utensils – at a lower price than the imported goods.

Read the full article on No Tech Magazine.


Design with the Other 90%: Cities

Posted in Events, Models by Kate Archdeacon on November 1st, 2011


Photo: iTrump: Warwick Junction

Design with the Other 90%: CITIES features sixty projects, proposals, and solutions that address the complex issues arising from the unprecedented rise of informal settlements in emerging and developing economies. Divided into six themes—Exchange, Reveal, Adapt, Include, Prosper and Access—to help orient the visitor, the exhibition shines the spotlight on communities, designers, architects, and private, civic, and public organizations that are working together to formulate innovative approaches to urban planning, affordable housing, entrepreneurship, nonformal education, public health, and more.

Design with the Other 90%: CITIES is the second in a series of themed exhibitions that demonstrate how design can be a dynamic force in transforming and, in many cases, saving lives. The first exhibition, in 2007, Design for the Other 90%, focused on design solutions that addressed the most basic needs of the 90% of the world’s population not traditionally served by professional designers.

Organized by Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, Design with the Other 90%: CITIES will be on view at the United Nations in New York City from October 17,2011 through January 9, 2012, and is available to travel in the United States and internationally beginning February 2012.

http://designother90.org/cities/home

Check out iTRUMP: Warwick Junction – a transformation of informal markets in Durban to flexible, low-cost structures and furnishings that support the local economy and provide opportunities for other industries to develop. KA


People & Planet International Photography Competition

Posted in seeking by Kate Archdeacon on April 1st, 2011


Image © People and Planet Diary 2011

The People & Planet International Photography Competition is open to amateur and professional photographers anywhere in the world. The competition aims to select 53 photos to be published in the 2012 People & Planet: Social Justice & Environment Diary & Calendar, which raise money for a group of Australian charities .

We’re looking for 53 images of people, places or things which tell a story about a social-justice or environment issue. Photos of almost any genre will be accepted, including portraits, landscapes, animals, objects, or any combination of these. We particularly like photos which tell “good news” stories about social-justice or the environment. With 53 spots up for grabs, this is an incredible opportunity to have your photos published and achieve international fame!
You can submit up to 4 photos per entrant. All submitted photos must be accompanied by 3-5 sentences describing the image and the social-justice or environment issues which are raised by the photo. Photos will be assessed jointly with the accompanying description.

The People & Planet International Photography Competition is open to everyone, and we particularly encourage people living in the developing/majority world to enter.

1st Prize: A$1,300
2nd Prize: A$350
Diary Cover Prize: A$350 

Entries close 31 May 2011

http://peopleandplanet.org.au/photo-competition/