Archive for December, 2008

The Sustainable Cities Network and VEIL wish you a Happy Christmas and a fantastic New Year!

Posted in Visions by fedwards on December 24th, 2008

The Sustainable Cities Network and the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab would like to wish you a Happy Christmas and a fantastic New Year! The Sustainable Cities Network will be on hold from 25 December to 12 January. We look forward to working with you all to achieve significant sustainable change in 2009!

Best,
Ferne Edwards
Sustainable Cities Network moderator


3nd European Fair on Education for Sustainable Development

Posted in Events by Devin Maeztri on December 22nd, 2008

Under the theme “Renewable Energy and Climate Change: Thematic Challenges to European Schools and Universities” , the 3nd European Fair on Education for Sustainable Development, is being organised by the Research and Transfer Centre “Applications of Life Sciences” of the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences and the Centre for Sustainable Construction (ZzB) Hamburg, under the auspices of the RCE Hamburg and Region.

The RCE Hamburg and Region is part of a global network of Regional Centres of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development (RCEs) coordinated by the United Nations University. The aims of the 3rd European Fair on Education for Sustainable Development are threefold:
i. to provide European organisations with an opportunity to display and present their works (i.e. policies research, activities, practical projects) as they relate to education for, with and about the environment with a focus on renewable energy and climate issues;

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Shipping News

Posted in Models by Devin Maeztri on December 19th, 2008

The section below is republished with permission from the Going Solar Transport Newsletter #88, 2 December 2008, compiled by Stephen Ingrouille. Going Solar newsletter provides an excellent commentary on local sustainable transport issues in Melbourne.

“Solar-powered sails the size of a jumbo jet’s wings will be fitted to cargo ships, after a Sydney renewable energy company signed a deal with China’s biggest shipping line. The Chatswood-based Solar Sailor group has designed the sails, which can be retro-fitted to existing tankers. The aluminium sails, 30 metres long and covered with photovoltaic panels, harness the wind to cut fuel costs by between 20 and 40 per cent, and use the sun to meet five per cent of a ship’s energy needs. China’s COSCO bulk carrier will fit the wings to a tanker ship and a bulker ship under a memorandum of understanding with the Australian company, which demonstrates the technology on a Sydney Harbour cruise boat. ‘It’s hard to predict a time line but at some point in the future, I can see all ships using solar sails – it’s inevitable’, said the company’s chief executive, Dr Robert Dane. Once fitted, the sails can pay for themselves in fuel savings within four years, Dr Dane said. They don’t require special training to operate, with a computer linked in to a ship’s existing navigation system, and sensors automatically angling the sails to catch a breeze and help vessels along.”
Ref: Ben Cubby, SMH, 28/10/08

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A Revolutionary new city bus, ‘Freight*Bus’ that’s so much more than just a means of transporting people, it’s a radical bus & urban freight system concept.

Posted in Models by hugh on December 16th, 2008

A real ‘step change’ in city transportation logistics, Freight*Bus marks the integration of passenger and freight transportation. It will have a profound impact on city infrastructure, providing increased passenger and freight capacity, improved convenience and service, whilst reducing congestion, pollution and real costs.

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Emissions-based Vehicle Excise Duty

Posted in Models, RDAG by Kate Archdeacon on December 12th, 2008

A different way of taxing car purchase & use provides consumers with rational pricing signals, based on environmental impacts, and may provide incentives to purchase more efficient vehicles.

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“Ride the Wind” CTrain

Posted in Models, RDAG by Kate Archdeacon on December 11th, 2008

An entire train system’s power-use is offset by the supplier’s payment to a wind-farm.


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London Congestion Charge

Posted in Models, RDAG by Kate Archdeacon on December 10th, 2008

The London Congestion Charge is a fee for some motorists travelling within those parts of London designated as the Congestion Charge Zone (CCZ). The charge aims to reduce traffic congestion and improve journey times by encouraging people to choose other forms of transport if possible.


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Bicycle-Bus Transit Systems

Posted in Models, RDAG by Kate Archdeacon on December 9th, 2008

By installing bike racks on buses and integrating the two transport systems, the viability of both cycling and bus transit (both of which are lower emission than the car) is increased.


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Predit: research, experimentation and innovation

Posted in Models, RDAG by Kate Archdeacon on December 9th, 2008

This information is part of research into case studies provided by Liz Boulton, Logistick, at the recent Sustainable Freight Seminar.

Predit is a French programme of research, experimentation and innovation in land transport, started by the ministries in charge of research, transport, environment and industry. It is not so much a case study as a methodology or a project management system.

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Fish and food security

Posted in Research by Devin Maeztri on December 8th, 2008

This abstract was recently listed on Australian Policy Online. To see the original document visit Fish and food security.

Fish and food security
Johann Bell / Secretariat of the Pacific Community
Posted: 21-11-2008

The right to food security is central to human development and many of the major human rights treaties. It is also implicit in Goal 1 of the Millennium Development Goals – eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. Food security is under threat in the Pacific. Agricultural production is not keeping pace with population growth and two thirds of Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) are now net importers of food. Regrettably, the low nutritional quality of many of these imports has increased the incidence of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.